The Best Budget Graphics Cards Under $200 in 2024: GPUs That Won’t Break Your Budget

GPUs under 200

The entry-level GPU space has been quiet for a few years, but in 2024 it has started to move again. Nvidia, AMD, and Intel all offer decent cards under $200:

  • Nvidia: GeForce RTX 3050 6GB (recently re-released)
  • AMD: Radeon RX 6600 (mid-range GPU from the previous generation)
  • Intel: Arc A580 (launched in late 2023)

Keep reading for more details on how the best budget GPUs compare in terms of real-world gaming performance. You will also find tips on what the used market offers at this price point.

AMD Vs. Nvidia Vs. Intel Under $200

The Nvidia alternative under $200 is currently the re-released RTX 3050 6GB. This GPU replaces the older and slower GeForce GTX 1650 and 1650S, while also introducing ray tracing in the budget space.

AMD’s previous-gen Radeon RX 6600 (non-XT) is usually a bit more expensive but also faster, with models like the PowerColor Fighter often selling for $199, making it the best budget GPU at this price point.

Intel’s new Arc A580 is also worth considering, although the driver support is still somewhat shaky (but steadily improving).

GPU
Best AMD
AMD Radeon RX 6600
Best Intel
Intel Arc A580
Image
PowerColor Fighter AMD Radeon RX 6600 Graphics Card with 8GB GDDR6 Memory
ASRock Intel ARC A380 Challenger ITX 6GB OC GDDR6 96-bit DisplayPort HDMI 0dB Silent Cooling 2250 MHz 7680 x 4320 PCI Express4.0 Graphics Card
Shading Units
1792
3072
Core/Boost Clock
1626 MHz / 2491 MHz
2000 MHz
FP32 Theoretical Performance
8.928 TFLOPS
2000 MHz
Memory Size/Type
8 GB/GDDR6
8 GB/GDDR6
Memory Bus
128-bit
256-bit
Memory Clock (Effective)
14 Gbps
16 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth
224 GB/s
512 GB/s
TDP
132 W
175 W
Recommended Power Supply
300 W
450 W
PCIe Power Connectors
1x 8-pin
2x 8-pin
Outputs (Reference)
1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DP 1.4a
1x HDMI, 3x DP
Shopping Links
Best AMD
GPU
AMD Radeon RX 6600
Image
PowerColor Fighter AMD Radeon RX 6600 Graphics Card with 8GB GDDR6 Memory
Shading Units
1792
Core/Boost Clock
1626 MHz / 2491 MHz
FP32 Theoretical Performance
8.928 TFLOPS
Memory Size/Type
8 GB/GDDR6
Memory Bus
128-bit
Memory Clock (Effective)
14 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth
224 GB/s
TDP
132 W
Recommended Power Supply
300 W
PCIe Power Connectors
1x 8-pin
Outputs (Reference)
1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DP 1.4a
Shopping Links
Best Intel
GPU
Intel Arc A580
Image
ASRock Intel ARC A380 Challenger ITX 6GB OC GDDR6 96-bit DisplayPort HDMI 0dB Silent Cooling 2250 MHz 7680 x 4320 PCI Express4.0 Graphics Card
Shading Units
3072
Core/Boost Clock
2000 MHz
FP32 Theoretical Performance
2000 MHz
Memory Size/Type
8 GB/GDDR6
Memory Bus
256-bit
Memory Clock (Effective)
16 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth
512 GB/s
TDP
175 W
Recommended Power Supply
450 W
PCIe Power Connectors
2x 8-pin
Outputs (Reference)
1x HDMI, 3x DP
Shopping Links

Last update on 2024-07-25 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

As measured in raw compute performance, the Arc A580 is the most powerful GPU under $200, but the Radeon RX 6600 is often faster in actual games thanks to its more mature set of drivers.

Here’s a quick look at relative GPU performance in Futuremark’s 3DMark Time Spy benchmark with some additional GPUs included for reference.

200 GPU 3DMark Time Spy chart

This benchmark has historically been a good indicator of what to expect in games. Unfortunately, the Intel Arc A580 is not as fast in the real world at this point. Some average frame rates from current triple-A titles:

Five game average

These are averages from Cyberpunk 2077, God of War, Spider-Man: Remastered, Jedi Survivor, and Hogwarts Legacy at 1080p with medium/high settings. The Arc A580 offers good value but is only just keeping up with the RX 6600.

Bottom line: The entry-level GPU market has been weak for some time, but Intel’s Arc A580 and the now more affordable Radeon RX 6600 are worthy of consideration. Until Intel’s Arc drivers improve, I would nevertheless argue that the Radeon RX 6600 remains the best GPU under $200. Nvidia’s RTX 3050 6GB is much better than the GTX 1650 that it replaces, but rasterization performance is lower than the competition and it’s usually not fast enough for ray-tracing at 60 FPS.

Buy Now or Wait?

AMD 2023 GPUIf you are timing release cycles to move in on the latest architectures, the entry-level space is as always lagging behind the pricier cards.

Nvidia and AMD’s latest RTX 4000 and RX 7000 series are available down to the $300 RTX 4060 and RX 7600.

Entry-level models of AMD’s latest GPU architecture could arrive later in 2024, but none have been announced yet. Nvidia, on the other hand, has just re-launched the RTX 3050 and I would not expect a sub-$200 RTX 4000-series GPU in the near future.

Intel’s Arc A580 chip was released at the end of 2023 and is not likely to be replaced by a next-gen Battlemage card this year.

Best GPU Below $200: Radeon RX 6600 (non-XT)

amd radeon rx 6600Launched in late 2021, AMD’s Radeon RX 6600 GPU has a successor in the RX 7600 (from 2023), which is around 30% faster but also priced as such. However, the RX 7600 launch came with some additional good news in the form of a price cut on the predecessor – or at least on some of the RX 6600 cards from AMD’s AIB (add-in board) partners.

The Radeon RX 6600 is a major step up from the RX 6500 XT, which was previously the best AMD GPU under $200. Not only is it as much as 60–70% faster in 1080p gaming – it also has double the amount of VRAM (8 GB of GDDR6) and is not hampered by a sub-par PCIe 4.0 x4 interface.

Compared to the Nvidia competition, it sits between the RTX 2060 and RTX 3060 on average, but its ray-tracing capabilities leave much to be desired. However, if you can pick one up for less than $200, the RX 6600’s price/performance ratio is quite outstanding.

Shopping Links:

Best Nvidia GPU Under $200: RTX 3050 6GB

Asus RTX 3050 6GB DualFor some time, the GeForce GTX 1650 or 1630 GPUs were all you could find from Nvidia under $200 but they are now finally replaced by the new(-ish) RTX 3050 6GB.

The bad news? It’s a cut-down, budget version of the original RTX 3050 8GB – and not just in the form of the smaller 6GB VRAM configuration.

The RTX 3050 6GB also has a smaller 96-bit memory bus, and fewer shading units (2,304 vs 2,560). Additionally, it has a much lower power budget of just 70 Watts compared to the original’s 130 W.

As a result, the new 6GB version is about 20% slower than the original 8GB model.

There is also an upside to the reduced power target, namely that the card doesn’t need external power. This can be an advantage when upgrading a pre-built PC that lacks a power supply with PCIe power connectors.

Shopping Links:

The Intel Alternative: Intel Arc A580

ASRock Intel Arc A580As previously mentioned, the Intel contender is now the Arc A580. Graphics cards using this GPU should theoretically be able to compete with e.g. the GeForce RTX 4060 and Radeon RX 7600. However, it is still far slower in actual games compared to AMD and Nvidia’s mainstream cards.

For now, it is roughly on par with the AMD RX 6600 in recent AAA titles but it is quite likely that it will become faster as the Arc drivers mature. We have seen this happen with the A750 and A770.

Speaking of which, Intel has reduced prices on both of the original Arc Alchemist GPUs to under $300, making them worthy of consideration as well.

Shopping Links:

Save ~$20: AMD Radeon RX 6500 XT

Radeon RX 6500 XTThe Radeon RX 6500 XT was a performance leader in the entry-level market for some time, even if this was mostly due to a lack of competition. In the best of circumstances, it is only slightly faster than its RX 5500 XT predecessor. But this is not the main issue.

What makes the RX 6500 XT difficult to recommend is that it requires a PCIe 4.0 interface to reach its full potential. In a PCIe 3.0 system, it will not have enough bandwidth, resulting in a 5–20% performance drop depending on the game. Before considering this card, you should be aware of this weakness.

Systems that support PCIe 4.0 include those based on AMD’s Ryzen 3000 and 5000 series, or Intel’s 11th-gen Core processors or later.

That said, an RX 6500 XT-based graphics card may still offer acceptable performance – especially for those with a Gen4 system looking for a very affordable gaming GPU.

The suggested power supply for any RX 6500 XT is 300 W and it requires only a single 6-pin PCIe power connector from your PSU.

Used AMD Radeon Cards: RX 5500 XT, RX 570/580/590

rx570 strixIf you are looking for a decent graphics card on a tight budget, the used market is also worth a look. Just be careful with cards that have been used for crypto mining 24/7, which is a particular risk with older mid-range cards with more than 4 GB of video memory (VRAM).

Used cards with AMD GPUs that may be of particular interest include:

  • Radeon RX 5500 XT & 5600 XT– As mentioned earlier, the RX 5500 XT is the 6500 XT’s predecessor. The older GPU is the better of the two since performance is about the same regardless of the interface used, as the RX 5500 XT can utilize the PCIe 3.0 interface properly. Also, some cards with this GPU come with 8 GB VRAM (instead of 4 GB), which perform even better (if slightly).
  • Radeon RX 570/580/590 – These cards are old and comparatively inefficient, but if you don’t mind a higher power consumption and have the PCIe power connectors to spare, the 580/590 in particular can offer performance on par with the more recent entry-level GPUs. They can often be found at attractive price points in the used market, but be aware that this generation of cards was very popular among miners.

Used Nvidia GeForce Cards: GTX 1660/1660S or RTX 2060

GeForce GTX 1650 Super

As opposed to the aforementioned AMD graphics cards, the 1650 Super and 1660 Super are still available in stores, though rarely for less than $200. Unlike Nvidia’s RTX lineup, the GTX 16-series cards are not capable of ray tracing or DLSS, but they do support NIS upscaling.

  • GTX 1660 – The original GTX 1660 has now been superseded by the GTX 1650S and 1660S. It was intended as a direct successor to the GTX 1060 but is considerably faster (15-20%) and more efficient. Compared to the AMD alternatives, the GTX 1660 is also faster than the previous-gen RX 580 or even the RX 590 in actual games.
  • GTX 1660 Super/Ti – Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1660 Super is almost as fast as the GTX 1660 Ti. Compared to the non-Super, the 1660 Super is based on the same chip with an identical amount of shaders and transistors but it’s equipped with faster GDDR6 VRAM.
  • RTX 2060 – Once Nvidia launches the RTX 4060, the RTX 2060 will have been succeeded by two generations, but it was and still is a very popular mid-range card. It’s about 20% faster than the GTX 1660 Super/Ti and still holds up well in 1080p gaming. There is also plenty of supply in the used market.

Summary

GTX 1660 ventusA lot has changed for the better as far as price/performance goes in the entry-level market. For now, graphics cards based on the Radeon RX 6600 GPU generally offer the best performance under $200 (or close to this price point). But it’s now in close competition with the Intel Arc A580, which may eventually overtake it if Intel improves its drivers.

The Nvidia GTX 3050 6GB, on the other hand, is now the best bus-powered card that doesn’t need external power. It is also faster than the outgoing GTX 1650 but slower than the Intel and AMD alternatives.

When looking at the used market, AMD’s Radeon RX 5500 XT, as well as old RX 570/580/590 cards, may still offer good value depending on current prices.  Especially the RX 590 is an attractive option if you don’t mind the higher power consumption. What that means is that you may need a bigger power supply unit (PSU) and sometimes an additional PCIe cable to power them. In the case of the RX 580 Nitro+, for example, you need one 8-pin and one 6-pin auxiliary (PCIe) power connector.

Factory Overclocking: Is it Worth It?

Factory overclocking is a somewhat controversial selling point. Most manufacturers bump the specs on their premium cards by raising the maximum GPU boost clock (and more rarely the VRAM speed), which is also reflected in the price tag. These slightly higher clock rates will not affect how much you can overclock the card. On the other hand, the larger coolers on more expensive cards are beneficial when overclocking.

Each GPU chip is unique quality-wise and therefore the chips’ overclocking capability varies. Unfortunately, you never know exactly how capable it is before you buy (hence it is called the “silicon lottery”). The main difference is that a factory-overclocked card is guaranteed to work at the specified clock rates, which is not the case otherwise. In some instances, pricier and factory-overclocked cards also have better cooling solutions than budget GPUs.

As for video memory (VRAM), more is always better, but entry-level cards will benefit less from large amounts of VRAM. Compared to 4 GB, an 8 GB card will (on average) improve frame rates by single-digit percentages, but may also allow for more details and higher resolutions (e.g. 1440p) with less significant performance drops. If the price difference is tiny, go with an 8 GB variety.

About System and PSU Requirements

PCIe power connector

You need at least one of these to power faster cards than the GTX 1650S and RX 6500 XT.

You certainly don’t need a monster gaming rig to power budget graphics cards around the $200 price range. The most important thing is to ensure that your power supply unit (PSU) is up to the task.

The most demanding of the cards mentioned on this page are the older ones based on the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590 GPUs. AMD recommends a 500-watt PSU for the entire system. This will, of course, depend on how power-efficient the rest of your system is. Typical board power is 185 Watts for the reference design RX 580, but overclocked cards may use a lot more.

Newer cards under $200 are far less demanding as they require a single PCI-Exppress connector at the most. The Radeon RX 6600 requires a single 8-pin connector and AMD recommends a minimum 450 Watt PSU, but you can likely get away with less as the card’s Typical Board Power is just 132 W.

Cost-Effective CPU Pairing

Other than the PSU, your other PC components should preferably be at least fairly recent. The processor (CPU) does affect what frame rates you’ll be getting, particularly at the lower resolutions that are suited to entry-level GPUs, e.g. 1080p.

However, most AMD Ryzen 5 and Core i5 models from the past few years are more than decent when paired with an entry-level GPU. Older AMD CPUs in general and some older Intel Core i3 CPUs, in particular, may have a more noticeably negative effect on frame rates. Among the latest entry-level CPUs, the Core i3-13100F is however a strong budget option.

If you already own a good mid-range CPU and want better gaming performance, upgrading to a faster GPU will yield more noticeable results compared to upgrading the CPU.

For larger budgets, also check our guides to the fastest GPUs below $300 or under $500.

When using links on our site to make a purchase, we may earn a commission at no additional cost to you. This does not affect how we rate products (see our Editorial Policy).

Gary
Gary

Though started gaming win NES Classic and Famicom, my love for PC gaming started in the late 90s with Command and Conquer Red Alert, Warcraft II, and PC versions of Golden Axe, Street Fighter, Prehistorik, Prince of Persia and many others. It also started my interest in PC hardware and software starting with DOS and Windows 3.11. I have been a computer technician for several internet cafes and retail stores in 2010s and that's also when I started writing for GamingPCBuilder.com

49 Comments
  1. Hello,
    I am running a
    AMD Ryzen 3 2300x quad-core
    8gb DDR4 RAM
    ASRock A320M-HDV R4.0 motherboard
    I was until recently running an XFX Radeon Rx 550 4GB, but that broke, so now I’m running a dell card from the early 2000s that i pulled from an old computer.
    I am just looking for a replacement card to run games like Halo and CoD, but I dont want to spend a crazy amount of money
    Any suggestions?

  2. Hello,

    I have a
    Processor – Intel Core i7 Extreme 975
    GPU – 2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030
    Motherboard – ASUSTeK Computer INC. P6T
    8GB Ram
    I mainly play less demanding games but I am trying to play GTA and COD but my computer just ain’t cutting it, what should I aim to upgrade first, also is DDR3 memory holding me back?

    • Hi Sean!

      As your system as a whole (not counting the GPU) is more than 10 years old, I would plan to eventually replace it entirely. The i7 975 CPU was great at launch but today it will struggle to push frame rates at 1080p compared to e.g. any recent Core i5. The DDR3 by itself should be less of a problem.

      But for short-term gains, the GPU would nevertheless be at the top of my list. If GPU prices weren’t still massively inflated, the GTX 1650S or RX 5500 XT are both around 300% faster than the GT 1030. In normal circumstances, either of those would be a very cost-effective upgrade.

      In today’s situation, the only decent card in the $200 area IMO is the GTX 1050 Ti, which is about twice as fast as the GT 1030. When looking at the used market, there seem to be some half-decent offers on RX 580 or 570 cards (some 2-3x faster).

  3. Hello,
    I have a Dell Optiplex 9010 SFF and am currently looking for a GPU.
    My specs:
    Intel i7-3770 CPU
    AMD Radeon HD 5450 GPU (yes, I know it’s trash)
    Stock motherboard (idk how to check the model)
    300 watts
    And I’m intending to play games like Hitman 2 and 3 at around 60-70 fps on high settings 1080p.

    Can you recommend one for me, please?

  4. Hey so my budget is around 200 and I have the Ibuypower Trace 4 MR Gaming Desktop

    Here is the link: https://www.bestbuy.com/site/ibuypower-trace-4-mr-gaming-desktop-amd-ryzen-5-3600-8gb-memory-nvidia-geforce-gt-730-2gb-240gb-ssd/6455488.p?skuId=6455488

    Everything is good on my pc except the card, can u recommend something for me please? The card is NVIDIA GeForce GT 730 2GB, and ik literally any other card is better, but I might get a card that doesnt work with my thing so pls help.

    • Hi MO,
      Yes, the problem there is clearly the low-end GPU. It’s an otherwise modern platform, so as long as you can find any recent graphics card in today’s market you should be fine. As you mention, just about any card would be an improvement.

      My only concern would be the power supply (PSU is missing from the specs on Bestbuy) and making sure that you have the connector(s) needed for a more powerful card, as the GT 730 is bus-powered. To know what to look for, check the last picture in the above article.

      If you have no PCIe power connector at all, there are adapters (e.g. Molex->PCIe 6-pin) that should work fine if it’s not an overly demanding card. Otherwise, the GTX 1650 (non-Ti) is currently the fastest bus-powered card if you don’t want to upgrade the PSU.

  5. Hello,

    I have a
    Intel i5 4670
    Asus b85-plus
    600 watt
    16gb RAM
    Asus gtx 970 4gb
    Already bought 24,5” 144hz monitor
    What i should upgrade first? I play csgo, valorant, apex legends and sometimes warzone.

    P.S. and im beginner of editing

    • Hi Karolis,
      The most cost-effective upgrade would usually be a new GPU. Unfortunately, it’s practically impossible to find a decent mid-range GPU with a normal price tag right now. Personally, I would wait a while with that upgrade.

      You could also see some decent improvements to your 1080p frame rates by upgrading your Haswell Core i5 system is to e.g. a Core i5 10600K, which would be particularly helpful in FPS gaming with a 144Hz monitor. In that case you would also need a new motherboard and DDR4 RAM, however.

  6. Hello someone find me a 1650 super under $200

  7. well I am screwed both of these cards have their cost not doubled, BUT TRIPLED that applies both to every retailer included even the aftermarket old used ones I am stuck with the cheap unworthy GT 1030

  8. Hey, these are all ether sold out or have been raised in price significantly. I was wondering if there are any other graphics cards under 200 or slightly over

    • Yes, unfortunately just about every GPU is unavailable at normal prices right now. Even used GPUs from previous generations are overpriced due to the extreme shortage.

      There are basically no good options for buyers right now, but some vendors may give you the option to preorder at a fair price. Occasionally, there are limited amounts of cards in stock, but these will fly off the shelves, so it might be a good idea to set up ‘in-stock notifications’ when possible.

  9. hey jesper, is there any places currently that sell 1650s/1660s for msrp price?

    • I’ve noticed that both Amazon and Newegg (and probably other major retailers) seem to stick to MSRP for cards in stock (i.e. ‘shipped and sold by’, third-party sellers are free to set their own prices). Problem is these don’t arrive often enough and sell out predictably fast.

      Preordering or setting up notifications of incoming stock can work, but that still involves waiting of course. I preordered a card late last year and had to wait over a month… Insane market right now.

  10. hi there i have a gtx 1050 with i5-6600k i am looking for an upgrade gpu my budget is 150-200 so what gpu should i go for

    • Hi Shaahidh,
      Normally, you would be able to find either an RX 5500 XT or GTX 1650S for $150-200, both of which would as much as double your frame rates compared to a GTX 1050 (non-Ti) on average.
      Right now, it’s unfortunately hard to find any specific GPU at normal prices due to the component shortage. If it was me, I would either wait a while to see if the supply situation clears up or look at the used market.

  11. please bro someone find me a 1650 super under $200

  12. Hi jesper i still dont know exactly whoch card i should buy.But i just want one card that can run about 150fps at Fortnite.

    • Hi there and sorry about the late reply! Is that your comment reply above with the 8700K? In any event, Fortnite is not overly demanding but 150 fps (144Hz/1080p?) is also a lot for any entry-level GPU, especially when paired with a comparatively older CPU.

      An RX 5500 XT or 1650S (preferably the latter) should be able to surpass that frame rate (average) at lower settings, possibly medium preset. I’ve never been into Fortnite or tested it much myself but found this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAe9Xqi2Wbk

  13. Hi Jesper!
    I’m currently trying to figure out which graphics card is the best fit for my build for about 200€ (it’s not a problem if it is a bit over). I was thinking about the gtx 1660 super but not sure if it’s too much or too little, I’m not really an expert 🙂
    My current build has:
    gtx1050 2 or 3 gb
    ryzen7 1800x
    asus b350-plus
    16gb crucial ram
    not sure about the power suply
    I mostly play cs:go and want a card that can give me close to 300fps in every map at relatively low resolution but I’m buying mafia and also play gtaV sometimes so was wondering what was the best fit for me.
    I also have 2 monitors (the one I play is 144hz) not sure if that makes any difference in the matter.
    Thought you had great advice for the other people so maybe you can help me out.

    • Wondering what would be the best fit for my current setup. At the moment I have an I7 8700k, 32gb ram, and a 4gb evga 1050ti SC…not sure if I should wait and get a 3080/3080ti later next year or get something in the mean time

  14. I’m attempting to price out a build, how much should I spend on a monitor to pair with one of these cards to get a good use of performance?

    • Hi Ian,
      Cards like the 1650S and RX 5500 XT can manage 1440p resolution but are really at their best at 1080p, which is still where you will find some of the most affordable monitors in any size category. Personally, I don’t play fast-paced games and would just ensure that it has an IPS or VA panel (both of which look a lot better than any TN panel) and a refresh rate of 5ms or less. If I was into FPS/eSports gaming, on the other hand, I would pair one of the above GPUs with a 144Hz adaptive sync monitor like the Asus VP249QGR (or similar).

  15. I know nothing about graphic cards. I’m an audio / video editor and just recently updates my software to FilmoraPro. They recommend Intel HD Graphics 5000 or later
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 700 or later
    AMD Radeon R5 240 or later
    2 GB vRAM (4GB required for HD and 4K videos)

    Im currently using Intel HD Graphics 4000. What would best work with my Dell Optiplex 7010 Running a VGA monitor and 2 HDMI monitors

    • Hi Tim,
      Intel HD Graphics 4000/5000 (and other Intel GPUs at this time) are integrated GPUs, i.e. part of the same package as the CPU. Any recent discrete GPU, i.e. standalone graphics card, is much faster at any job compared to integrated graphics.

      Personally, I have no experience with Filmora but was curious as to how it might scale performance-wise and found this short video comparing rendering/exports with CPU Vs. Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti and 1650 Super:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekd8qvqCGtA

  16. Hi Jesper, need some advice, I recently upgraded to a ryzen 3100 with a b550 board, looking at getting a graphics card, currently have a 750ti, i play games like battlefield 5, war of rights on steam. Would the 5500xt work better with the pci 4.0 over the 1650 super or even 1660? Thanks pete

    • Hi Pete! For now, the doubled bandwidth provided by PCIe 4.0 over PCIe 3.0 is usually just a benefit for SSDs, as these were previously bottlenecked by the 3.0 version of the interface. Since GPUs always use the full-size x16 PCIe slot, bandwidth has (so far) not been much of an issue.

      Gen4 may have a slight advantage in some cases, but not enough that it would affect my choice of GPU.

      But regardless of the PCIe version, the RX 5500XT should perform better than the 1650 Super in Battlefield V. In this game, the 5500 XT (8GB version) seems to be on par with the 1660. https://www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/msi-radeon-rx-5500-xt-gamingx-8gb-review,12.html

  17. Hi Jesper!
    My system is getting old. I have an i7-4770, 16gb ddr3 1600 ram, 2 ssds and 1 hdd, gtx 750ti, GigaByte GA-Z87MX-D3H (rev. 1.x) motherboard, PSU CoolerMaster Masterwatt lite 600 watts.
    I was really thinking in getting the rx 590, should I? Why yes or why not? By the way I live in South America so everything is more expensive here.
    Thanks in advance!
    My Discord: patotato2003#8152

    • Hi Patrick!
      Yes it’s getting old, but the i7-4770 is still a more than decent CPU (I still have a 4770S myself paired with an RX 580 on an entry-level Asus board that’s frequently in use). But as you are probably aware, the GTX 750 Ti is the one component that hasn’t aged very well. The RX 590 is about five times faster than the 750 ti in terms of compute performance and often 2-3 times faster in games (depending on game/settings).

      So if you are just looking for a major GPU upgrade without changing anything else whatsoever, then I would say the RX 590 is definitely worthwhile 🙂 (if it’s reasonably priced where you live). Your PSU will handle an RX 590 easily as long as you still have the PCIe power cables (I believe the 750 Ti is bus-powered but most RX 590s need a single 8-pin power connector).

    • I want to play Rainbow Six Siege, stream, record videos, and edit them in Davinci Resolve Studio that has hardware acceleration for gpu.

  18. I am upgrading an HPZ800 workstation (for iRacing sim racing 1080p single screen use) and currently have the dual X5687 xeons, 32gb ram, 500GB SSD. It still has the standard 850W power supply. I was looking for an RX580 8gb card but after reading this article, perhaps I should spend a bit more and get the GTX 1650S to make sure I am keeping within my 850W supply? How do i tell how much the system is already using?

    • Hi Julian,
      The system’s total power consumption can be measured from the socket using e.g. a kill-a-watt power monitor (or a multimeter with the same functionality). It’s highly unlikely that you will have an issue with an 850W PSU though, even with the dual Xeons (130W each). What I did notice when looking up the HP’s specs is that the PSU seems to come with 6-pin PCIe connectors only. The 1650S uses a 6-pin connector but the RX 580 normally uses a single 8-pin connector, which will require a 6-pin to 8-pin adapter.

  19. Guess ill just get the GeForce GTX 1650.

  20. I’m currently using an EVGA 950 and am torn between waiting for 1660 Super to go under 200 (hopefully, with the release of the 3k series) or getting the 1650 Super already.
    Is it worth the wait and price difference?

    • Hi Andrés,
      Last year, with the original versions of the GTX 1660 and 1650, I would have steered clear of these cards as they were overpriced (the original 1650 in particular) compared to the previous-gen AMD cards.

      Right now, the 1650S and 1660S are much more competitive in terms of price/performance and currently priced about right compared to their AMD counterparts IMO.

      As usual with a new generation, Nvidia will be releasing the high-end RTX 3000 series cards first. We will likely have to wait several more months for the mid-range and budget Ampere cards to shake things up in those areas. But it’s notoriously difficult to guess where GPU prices are heading. Since we are still right between two generations (not counting the high-end cards), my personal guess is that prices will hover around here for a while (though the 1660S could drop below 200 temporarily).

      • This is incredibly helpful!
        Guess I’ll just go for the 1650 and be happy for around 4-5 years before heading elsewhere should some games require it.
        For me the 200 Dollars barrier is key, because customs will kill me with an extra 60% for things over that mark. So, a 201 dollars card would end up costing me 321 Dollars. So yeah, kinda hard no!

  21. Hello,

    I have a AMD Radeon R7 360 that is a 6 pin power connector that came in an ibuypower pc I bought for iracing. I run three monitors now and it can’t keep up. What should I buy for around $150-190?

    My processor is an AMD FX 6300 6 core.

    I don’t know much about gaming pcs I just want to play iracing I have been trying to do research but it seems endless.

    Thank you

  22. Hi Jesper,

    Thanks for the prompt response.
    Yes i will look for RX570 gpu. But how about RX580, is it a better buy? In my country, I see a lot of RX580 compare to RX570. Thanks.

    • Try to go with at least Rx 5500 xt in my opinion. The Rx 570/580/590 is the older on the way out cards. I’m actually building a computer for my daughter and $200 is all I’m gonna spend and the 5500xt is what I’m looking at unless I upgrade my Rx 5700.

  23. Hi Jesper,

    Thanks for the prompt response.
    Yes i will look for RX570 gpu. But how about RX580, is it a better buy? In my country, I see a lot of RX580 compare to RX570. Thanks.

    • The RX 580 is typically 10-15% faster than the RX 570 (some games a little more, some slightly less). So if the price difference is small where you live, the 580 might be an even better option, especially if it’s an 8GB card (most 570s are 4GB).

  24. Hello,

    I have a
    Intel i5 7th gen skylake
    Asus h81m-d motherboard
    Aerocool 500w true rated psu
    8gb hyperx RAM
    And currently dont have gpu.
    Already bought 27″ 75hz monitor

    What gpu can you recommend for me? I played cs go and dota 2 only.

    • Correction in my processor. i think it is only i5 4th generation

    • Hi Mark,
      CS:GO and DOTA 2 are two of the least demanding games today. So if you are only playing these two games, any of the cards mentioned above will easily run at 1080p at an average FPS of 75+.

      If I were you, I would look at AMD RX 570-based cards, which are from the previous generation but still among the best in terms of price/performance when sold at around $150 (and they sometimes go for less). Your PSU and the rest of your system would be a good match.

  25. Thanks for your comment! All of the GPUs we mention above are several times faster than your current card. Even the 1050 ti is around 5x the performance of the GT730. Something to keep in mind if you are upgrading your current system is that all cards above the GTX 1650 require a separate PCIe power connector from your power supply. There’s a good chance that your computer doesn’t have one, as the old GT730 doesn’t need one either. Also check check the measurements to make sure that it will fit in your case (I know that there are many pre-built small form factor systems with the GT 730)

  26. I have been using nvidia GT 730 for the past 3 years now and i am looking for a change, what i am looking for is a mid budget card around $200 although i cannot decide on my own, about which GPU I should buy.

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