The Best Graphics Cards Under $300 in Early 2024

GPUs under 300

The current-gen GPUs competing for your $300 budget in early 2024 are the following:

  • AMD: Radeon RX 7600 (8 GB)
  • Nvidia: GeForce RTX 4060 (8 GB)
  • Intel: Arc A770 (16 GB)

Deciding on one of them is a bit harder and depends on your preferences. AMD Radeon RX 7600 AIBs are the most affordable on average – and the Intel GPU comes with twice the amount of VRAM – but I would still argue that the RTX 4060 is the one to pick at this price point. This page will dive into the pros and cons of each alternative, including some good reasons why you might disagree with my pick.

NVIDIA Vs. AMD Vs. Intel Under $300

The current generation of graphics cards will not go down in history for their generational uplift – and this goes for both AMD and Nvidia.

Some good news is that AMD lowered the MSRP of its Radeon RX 7600 right after launching it, while Intel followed with its Arc A770. Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 4060 is however holding steady at just under $300 for the entry-level AIB models.

Product
Best AMD
Radeon RX 7600
Best NVIDIA
GeForce RTX 4060
Best Intel
Intel Arc A770
Image
PowerColor Fighter AMD Radeon RX 7600 Gaming Graphics Card
ASUS Dual GeForce RTX™ 4060 OC Edition 8GB GDDR6 (PCIe 4.0, 8GB GDDR6, DLSS 3, HDMI 2.1a, DisplayPort 1.4a, 2.5-Slot Design, Axial-tech Fan Design, 0dB Technology, and More)
Intel Arc A750 Limited Edition 8GB PCI Express 4.0 Graphics Card
Shading Units
2048
3072
4096
Base/Boost Clock
1720 MHz / 2655 MHz
1830 MHz / 2460 MHz
2100 MHz / 2400 MHz
FP32 Compute
21.75 TFLOPS
15.11 TFLOPS
19.66 TFLOPS
Memory Size/Type
8 GB GDDR6
8 GB GDDR6
16 GB GDDR6
Memory Bus
128-bit
128-bit
256-bit
Memory Clock (Effective)
18 Gbps
17 Gbps
16 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth
288 GB/s
272 GB/s
512 GB/s
TDP
165 W
115 W
225 W
Recommended PSU
450 W
300 W
550 W
Power Connector(s)
1x 8-pin
1x 8-pin
1x 8-pin + 1x 6-pin
Outputs (Reference)
1x HDMI 2.1a, 3x DP 2.1
1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DP 1.4a
1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DP 2.0
Launch MSRP
$269
$299
$329
Shopping Links
Best AMD
Product
Radeon RX 7600
Image
PowerColor Fighter AMD Radeon RX 7600 Gaming Graphics Card
Shading Units
2048
Base/Boost Clock
1720 MHz / 2655 MHz
FP32 Compute
21.75 TFLOPS
Memory Size/Type
8 GB GDDR6
Memory Bus
128-bit
Memory Clock (Effective)
18 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth
288 GB/s
TDP
165 W
Recommended PSU
450 W
Power Connector(s)
1x 8-pin
Outputs (Reference)
1x HDMI 2.1a, 3x DP 2.1
Launch MSRP
$269
Shopping Links
Best NVIDIA
Product
GeForce RTX 4060
Image
ASUS Dual GeForce RTX™ 4060 OC Edition 8GB GDDR6 (PCIe 4.0, 8GB GDDR6, DLSS 3, HDMI 2.1a, DisplayPort 1.4a, 2.5-Slot Design, Axial-tech Fan Design, 0dB Technology, and More)
Shading Units
3072
Base/Boost Clock
1830 MHz / 2460 MHz
FP32 Compute
15.11 TFLOPS
Memory Size/Type
8 GB GDDR6
Memory Bus
128-bit
Memory Clock (Effective)
17 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth
272 GB/s
TDP
115 W
Recommended PSU
300 W
Power Connector(s)
1x 8-pin
Outputs (Reference)
1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DP 1.4a
Launch MSRP
$299
Shopping Links
Best Intel
Product
Intel Arc A770
Image
Intel Arc A750 Limited Edition 8GB PCI Express 4.0 Graphics Card
Shading Units
4096
Base/Boost Clock
2100 MHz / 2400 MHz
FP32 Compute
19.66 TFLOPS
Memory Size/Type
16 GB GDDR6
Memory Bus
256-bit
Memory Clock (Effective)
16 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth
512 GB/s
TDP
225 W
Recommended PSU
550 W
Power Connector(s)
1x 8-pin + 1x 6-pin
Outputs (Reference)
1x HDMI 2.1, 3x DP 2.0
Launch MSRP
$329
Shopping Links

Last update on 2024-03-01 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Out of the current crop of graphics cards under $300, the GeForce RTX 4060 is the most recent, launched in June 2023. AMD’s Radeon RX 7600 arrived in May, whereas Intel’s mid-range Arc A770 is from late 2022.

In terms of average rasterization performance, the AMD and Nvidia GPUs are evenly matched, but the RTX cards are significantly better at ray tracing.

As for the Intel alternative, the Arc A770 now performs quite well after a series of driver improvements. But despite having access to more memory (VRAM), the A770 is still slower in quite a few games.

Relative Gaming Performance with Current $300 GPUs

To put the current mainstream cards into perspective, here is an indication of how they perform (no ray tracing enabled):

300 GPU Time Spy chart

The RTX 4060 and RX 7600 are very evenly matched in Futuremark’s Time Spy benchmark, and this reflects their average performance in actual games (with ray tracing disabled). Intel’s Arc A770 is however not as fast in real games as this benchmark score implies. It is instead slightly slower (by about 5%).

Relative Ray-Tracing Performance

Once you enable ray tracing in titles that support it, Nvidia cards are substantially faster than their closest competitors.

300 GPU Port Royal chart

With ray tracing on, Nvidia’s RTX cards are a generation ahead of their rivals. This includes the Intel Arc A770 once you move on to testing a range of actual games. The 3DMark Port Royal benchmark scores even somewhat understate Nvidia’s advantage.

What About Resolution Scaling? DLSS Vs. FSR

Frame rates at native resolutions are still a determining factor, but upscaling features like Nvidia’s DLSS (Deep Learning Super Sampling) and AMD’s FSR (FidelityFX Super Resolution) have also become increasingly useful and important. Intel also offers a similar solution known as XeSS (Xe Super Sampling).

Nvidia only offers DLSS with its RTX GPU lineup, whereas AMD and Intel’s alternatives work with all graphics cards. Older Nvidia GTX cards can instead benefit from NIS upscaling, a similar but less sophisticated alternative. Any of these technologies is useful for upscaling to higher resolutions, but Nvidia is arguably still in the lead:

Buy Now or Wait?

gpu upgradingUpgrading your graphics card is nearly always the most cost-effective way to revive your existing gaming PC. But even early adopters rarely upgrade more often than once every one or two generations (not counting annual ‘refresh’ cycles, which are usually just minor updates to existing architectures). That translates to about once every 2–4 years – or when the latest AAA titles start to feel sluggish.

Under normal circumstances, the most common reason to postpone a GPU purchase is to time one of the major generational releases. In the past year and a half, I have nevertheless recommended waiting due to poor availability and extremely inflated prices.

In early 2024, the situation is different. It’s easy to find the latest graphics cards at the usual places and prices are stable. As for generational leaps, Nvidia and AMD’s latest mainstream GPUs under $300 are the RTX 4060 from June 2023, and RX 7600 from May 2023.

Intel’s Arc A750 and A770 are however mid-cycle GPUs from late 2022 and their potential successors known as ‘Battlemage’ are expected to arrive later in 2024. Performance and pricing for the Battlemage GPUs are still unknowns at this point, however.

None of the current crop of cards offer any sort of revolutionary performance increases gen-over-gen, but it’s hard to get the timing much better.

Best GPU Under $300: GeForce RTX 4060

GeForce RTX 4060 graphics cards

Graphics cards based on Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 4060 GPU were released on 29 June 2023 – about a month after its main AMD competitor, the Radeon RX 7600. There is no Founders Edition reference model of the RTX 4060, but several dual-fan cards from Nvidia’s AIB (add-in board) partners are available at the promised $299 MSRP.

In terms of average gaming performance, the RTX 4060 is not necessarily faster than the RX 7600 but is significantly faster with ray tracing turned on. Compared to previous-gen cards, it sits between the RTX 3060 and RTX 3060 Ti, but due to the limited memory (VRAM) configuration, the lead narrows when you turn up the resolution from 1080p to 1440p or 4K.

The Nvidia GPU is nevertheless slightly ahead of its main competitors on average, and Nvidia’s arguably superior DLSS upscaling technology gives it an edge. DLSS 3 frame generation tech might help it even further, but how it compares to AMD’s upcoming FSR 3 competitor remains to be seen.

Shopping links:

Best AMD GPU Under $300: Radeon RX 7600

Radeon RX 7600

AMD released the Radeon RX 7600 GPU on May 25, 2023, and immediately reduced its MSRP from an original $299 to $269, which is also reflected in most third-party cards from AMD’s board partners. The name implies that this is a successor to the Radeon RX 6600 non-XT, but it is more technically similar to the RX 6600 XT and RX 6650 XT.

Being based on the new RDNA 3 architecture, it is also faster than all of the RX 6600-series cards and only slightly slower than the RX 6700 XT. Compared to its Nvidia counterparts, it is comparable to the RTX 4060 and usually faster than the RTX 3060.

Much like the RTX 4060, the RX 7600 is limited by its 8GB of VRAM and 128-bit memory bus, meaning that both cards perform best at 1080p without upscaling. At this resolution, the card is still fast enough for high refresh-rate gaming (120+ FPS) in many esports titles and 60+ FPS in more demanding single-player titles.

Shopping links:

RTX 4060 vs. RX 7600: Very Similar Performance

With ray-tracing turned off, Nvidia and AMD’s mainstream cards are very evenly matched in this generation, even if the Nvidia GPU is more power-efficient.

More VRAM Under $300: RTX 3060 12 GB

geforce rtx 3060

Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 3060 series of GPUs has been incredibly successful for good reasons. Even if it is now more than two years old, it can often compete with its RTX 4060 successor.

This is especially true for the original 12 GB version of the RTX 3060, which remains interesting because it offers 50% more VRAM in addition to a bigger 192-bit memory bus.

The VRAM difference is especially noticeable at higher resolutions, where the RTX 3060 12GB can often match the RTX 4060. What it doesn’t have is support for DLSS 3 frame generation, which is now available in an increasing number of AAA titles.

Shopping links:

The Alternative: Intel Arc A770

intel arc a750Intel’s Arc A-series cards were launched in mid-2022 to high expectations that they mostly failed to meet. Not only were the cards slower than expected with the launch drivers – they were practically nowhere to be found across North America or Europe. And if you managed to locate an Arc graphics card, it would not be priced competitively compared to the tried-and-tested alternatives from AMD and Nvidia.

Things have changed in 2024, as Intel has not only made the Arc A750 and A770 available but also trimmed their prices substantially. At the time of writing, the 16 GB A770 can usually be found under $300. It’s also much better than at launch time thanks to multiple driver improvements. Some driver headlines include significant average fps gains, along with 60% 99th percentile fps improvements versus the launch driver.

At the same time, this is Intel’s first generation of dedicated gaming graphics cards. As such, A770 owners are early adopters. But if you don’t mind taking the leap, the price/performance ratio for the Arc A770 is very appealing, not least considering the 16 GB of VRAM.

Note that Resizable BAR (ReBAR) support is critical for the Intel Arc GPUs to perform well. This feature is normally available in systems based on 10th-gen Intel Core/AMD Ryzen 3000-series or later. Read more here.   

Shopping links:

Budget Plus ~$50: Radeon RX 6700 XT

rx 6700 seriesIf you are flexible with your $300 budget, there are alternatives in either direction – mainly from AMD, as these GPUs are currently the most attractive from a pure price/performance standpoint. The Radeon RX 6700 XT has recently dropped in price and can now sometimes be picked up for not much more than $350.

It is a clear step up from the RX 6650 XT and even the RX 7600 – especially at higher resolutions where it can flex its additional VRAM. The RX 6700 XT uses Navi 22 graphics processor (RDNA 2) with 2560 shading units compared to the aforementioned cards’ 2048, and the memory bandwidth is also significantly higher.

Shopping links:

Budget Minus ~$50: RX 6650 XT or RTX 3050

Radeon 6600Launched in mid-2022, the Radeon RX 6650 XT is a minor update of the RX 6600 XT, which was AMD’s first mid-range GPU based on the RDNA 2 architecture. What differs is mainly that the RX 6650 XT offers more memory bandwidth and slightly higher clock speeds, at the cost of some additional power draw. It is by no means drastically faster than the RX 6600 XT, but either of them will outperform the previous-gen RX 5600 XT and RX 5700 XT.

Compared to the Nvidia competitors, the RX 6650 XT trades blows with the GeForce RTX 3060 depending on the game. However, compared to the Nvidia RTX competitors, it lacks dedicated hardware for ray tracing and image upscaling, meaning that performance with ray tracing, in particular, is lower.

In all, the RX 6650 XT has more than enough performance for 1080p gaming, and depending on the settings, it can usually reach a 60 fps average in 1440p. The original MSRP was $399 but some varieties are now sometimes available for around $250.

Shopping links:

GeForce RTX 3050Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 3050 offers less raw performance than its closest AMD competitors, but it does come with the RTX features, i.e. ray tracing and DLSS upscaling.

In fact, the RTX 3050 is the first of Nvidia’s mainstream XX50-tier cards to receive support for these technologies. Although it may not be powerful enough to run AAA titles with RT on at higher resolutions, Nvidia’s excellent upscaling tech makes the value proposition more interesting.

Performance-wise, it compares well to mid-range cards from the previous generation including the RX 5600 XT and GTX 1660 Ti/Super but it is around 10% slower than the RTX 2060.

Previous-Gen/Used Graphics Cards

If you want to get the best possible price/performance from your GPU purchase, you may also want to take a look at previous-gen cards and the used market. With some luck, you may be able to find older mid-range GPUs such as AMD’s RX 5600 XT, or Nvidia’s GTX 1660 Ti/S for significantly less than $300. But beware of used mining cards that have been used 24/7 for months, which may have shortened their life span.

Option #1: GeForce RTX 2060

RTX 2060 Founder's EditionWhen the pandemic-related shortages were at their worst, Nvidia opted to alleviate the issues by reintroducing the previous-gen GeForce RTX 2060. As the supply chain woes have subsided, there has been a surplus of these popular mid-range graphics cards on the market.

Although the newer RTX 3050 is more efficient, the RTX 2060 is clearly faster. The RTX 2060’s direct successor, the RTX 3060, is of course faster still but also more expensive.

Note that there are two versions of the desktop RTX 2060: one with 6 GB of VRAM and a newer model with 12 GB. The original 6 GB configuration is usually far more affordable and the frame rate advantage with the 12GB model varies between none at all and less than 10%.

Option #2: Radeon RX 5600 XT

AMD’s Radeon RX 5600 XT GPU was launched in 2020 and is based on the first-gen Navi (RDNA) architecture, replacing the much less efficient Vega and Polaris architectures. This GPU was initially intended to compete with Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1660 Ti. But then Nvidia suddenly lowered the price on its faster, ray tracing-enabled GeForce RTX 2060 to compete directly with the RX 5600 XT.

This in turn prompted AMD to improve the specs of the 5600 XT to help it stay competitive. As a result, the RX 5600 XT is almost as fast as the RX 5700 – and considerably faster on average than the GTX 1660 Ti that it was originally meant to compete with.

Now with similar performance as the GeForce RTX 2060, the RX 5600 XT stands out as one of the most attractive graphics cards in the mid-range segment from earlier generations. What you likely want to check before buying is that you get a card with the best specs, mainly faster VRAM that runs at an effective 14 Gbps instead of 12 Gbps such as these ones:

Sapphire Radeon
Pulse RX 5600 XT
XFX RX 5600 XT
THICC II PRO
PowerColor Radeon
RX 5600 XT
Clock: Core /
Gaming / Boost
1400 MHz /
1615 MHz /
1750 MHz
1465 MHz /
1560 MHz /
1620 MHz
1355 MHz /
1560 MHz /
1620 MHz
Memory Speed14 Gbps14 Gbps14 Gbps
FP32 Theoretical Performance8,064 GFLOPS7,465 GFLOPS7,465 GFLOPS
Memory Bandwidth336 GB/s336 GB/s288 GB/s
Recommended
PSU
350 W350 W350 W
Power Connectors1x 8-pin1x 8-pin1x 8-pin
Display Outputs1x HDMI
3x DP
1x HDMI
3x DP
1x HDMI
3x DP

Alternative #3-4: GeForce GTX 1660 Ti/Super

MSI 1660S Gaming X

As mentioned previously, AMD’s RX 5600 XT was originally intended as a competitor to Nvidia’s former mid-range king, the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti. For the reasons mentioned above, that didn’t happen, but the 1660 Ti is nevertheless about as fast as the current-gen RTX 3050.

That means that this cad will easily handle any recent AAA game at 1080p, although it lacks the ray-tracing features from the RTX lineup. In terms of relative performance, the RTX 2060 and RX 5600 XT are about 15% faster.

As for the price/performance calculation, the GTX 1660 Ti is also challenged by Nvidia’s own GTX 1660 Super, which is only slightly slower but usually much more affordable. The GeForce GTX 1660 Super, or 1660S, is an update to the original GTX 1660 and is almost as fast as the Ti variant.

The 1660S actually uses the same GPU as the regular GTX 1660 but has been paired with faster GDDR6 video memory. This resulted in a level of performance that trails the 1660 Ti by just single-digit percentages.

RX 5600 XT Vs. RTX 2060 Vs. RX 5700

Here’s a video from the web comparing actual performance in a number of games including Battlefield V, Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey, Metro: Exodus, and others. What makes this particularly interesting is that the resolution is 1440p, instead of the 1080p resolution that these graphics cards are intended to target.

RX 5600 XT vs. RTX 2060 vs. RX 5700

Summary and Recommendations

RTX 4060 and RX 7600

At the start of 2024, the $300 price point is not as exciting as we may have hoped, but there’s at least some competition. In terms of raw rasterization performance, AMD’s Radeon RX 7600 and Nvidia’s RTX 4060 are extremely even, and the Intel Arc A770 is also competitive if a bit less consistent.

The Nvidia RTX cards are undeniably great when it comes to ray tracing and driver support is historically excellent. These factors put the RTX 4060 in a slight lead, although the price/performance ratio for the RX 7600 is tempting thanks to a more modest price tag.

CPU Pairing and PSU Requirements

PCIe power connector

Most Radeon RX 7600 and GeForce RTX 4060 cards require a single 8-pin connector.

To get the most out of your new mid-range GPU, the rest of your PC build should correspond reasonably well to your choice of video card. However, in terms of gaming performance, you won’t gain much by opting for an expensive high-end CPU.

In my view, a good baseline CPU pairing is the AMD Ryzen 5 3600X/5600X or an Intel Core i5-12600K/13600K. When building a new system, a Ryzen 5 7600 and B650 motherboard combo is arguably a great choice. For tighter budgets, AMD’s AM4 platform (like a 5600X3D and B550 board) is excellent value.

You may need a better CPU for other reasons than gaming, but in terms of frame rates, you will get diminishing returns beyond what you get from any of the latest mid-range processors. If the goal is to have your games run more smoothly, your budget will make more of a difference when focused on a faster GPU.

As for the power supply (PSU), AMD recommends a 550 W PSU minimum for the RX 7600. The TDP (Thermal Design Power) is however only 165 W and taking other mid-range components into account, a 450W PSU should be more than enough. Any such power supply on the market will provide you with the single 8-pin PCIe power connector that you need to hook up your GPU. Nvidia’s RTX 4060 is more frugal and the minimum PSU recommendation is only 300 W.

For smaller or larger budgets, check out our guides to the best GPUs under $200 or under $500.

When using links on our site to make a purchase, we may earn a commission at no additional cost to you. This does not affect how we rate products (see our Editorial Policy).

Jesper Berg
Jesper Berg

I got started with PC building in the 3dfx Voodoo era somewhere back in the 1990s, and have been writing for tech publications for a bit more than a decade. In other words old enough to have lost count of the times PC gaming has been pronounced dead.

20 Comments
  1. Hi, I was thinking on buying the Arc A770 or the RTX 4060 my main use is going to be for ML which would you recomend more? Also would you reconed paring it with a Ryzen 7 5800x or Ryzen 5 7600x? If im buying a dedicated GPU does having an iGPU matter?

    • Hi Massimiliano, that’s a hugely interesting question. When just looking at compute performance, the A770 should be faster. But thanks to the Tensor cores (and possibly other factors), Nvidia GPUs perform way better in e.g. Stable Diffusion (https://www.tomshardware.com/pc-components/gpus/stable-diffusion-benchmarks). Developer preference and optimizations for Nvidia also makes it easier in general to get up and running with RTX cards.

      Unless I had a highly specific use case where Intel is known to perform well, I would personally go with Nvidia even if it has 50% less VRAM. The choice of CPU (or iGPU) should have little to no effect on these types of GPU workloads.

  2. I made the mistake of buying a 3050 in a laptop. I now see my mistake as the lifespan is shortened a lot by this limiting GPU. Since you cannot upgrade a laptop in any significant way you’re stuck with an earlier end of life. Even mid-range gaming is not affordable in my opinion. But if you go that route don’t get caught up in buying a laptop. Go with an affordable desktop you can at least upgrade and extend out its life better than a laptop. I certainly won’t buy a laptop for gaming again. You need some deep pockets to keep upgrading to next gen laptop hardware.

  3. As someone looking to spend £200 max (the actual price most people spend on a GPU), I find the vast majority of cards which would have been released at that price a year ago are now priced at double this.

    So we end up with the only new “mid-range” card the 6600xt being released pretending its a “high-end” card, so it can justify a ludicrous mark up. Its not worth MSRP, let alone the “because its 2021 lets add another 50%” issue.

    So what is there for folks to buy at £200? Because I’m quite simply refusing to spend that on a second hand 3-4 year old card that’ll be outdated within 12 months.

    • Finding a mid-range card at a normal mid-range price is still nearly impossible, unfortunately. The miner-created shortage a few years ago was nothing compared to today’s market.

      Availability has improved, but as you mentioned, prices are still extremely inflated. And there is so much pent-up demand now that this could go on for quite some time.

      I’ve managed to buy a couple of cards in the past year at somewhat reasonable prices (but still far from normal) by pre-ordering. Had to wait for 2-3 months each time though…

  4. Need a new vid card but prices are out of hand dam bitcoin miners

  5. Hey thx in advance Mr Jesper Berg

    the guide is good , anyway do you have any relation with håkan berg the king of birds ?

    • Hey Pand, thanks! Haha, no I hadn’t even heard of this King of birds, so I had to look him up. A fun guy. His comedic use of Wittgenstein’s duck-rabbit makes me wish I was related 🙂

  6. Could someone tell me the best build on a say 900-1000$ budget for a pc, monitor, keyboard, mouse thanks would be helpful

  7. Thank you for this great article! I haven’t been able to locate the EVGA 2060 KO in Canada for my new build, so all the info here has been a huge help on figuring out a replacement. Thanks!!!

  8. Hey Japser. I’m currently building my first gaming pc and having an issue with finding correctly advertised GPUs. The prices in your article was updated 12 days ago, but none of prices listed here reflect the actual prices. Some of the links you’ve shared take us to either site where the item is $150 to almost 2x the MSRP price you gave us. My question is, why are computer parts or accessories price points so unstable?

  9. this is exactly the article I was looking for! Well put-together and extremely helpful, I’ll definitely be looking at a 5600xt for my current build. Your other article on choosing a 5600xt is also great

  10. Hi Jesper!
    I’m currently trying to figure out which graphics card is the best fit for my build for 200-300$. I was thinking about the gtx 1660 super but not sure if it’s too much or too little, I’m not really an expert 🙂
    My current build has:
    gtx1050 2 or 3 gb
    ryzen7 1800x
    asus b350-plus
    16gb crucial ram
    not sure about the power suply
    I mostly play cs:go and want a card that can give me at least 200fps in every map at relatively low resolution but I’m buying mafia and also play gtaV sometimes so was wondering what was the best fit for me.
    I also have 2 monitors (the one I play is 144hz) not sure if that makes any difference in the matter.
    Thought you had great advice for the other people so maybe you can help me out.

    • Hey Seb!
      The 1660S is my personal favorite from the current crop of mid-range cards. It’s almost as fast as the 1660 Ti, but usually much cheaper. By itself, this GPU will be able to give you a 200+ fps average in CS:GO, but CS:GO is also one of the older and less demanding games where your CPUs single-core performance (1st-gen Ryzen’s main weakness) might become a bottleneck, particularly at low resolutions.

      I still have no doubts whatsoever that you can go above a 144fps average at 1080p to match your monitor. Mafia Definitive and GTA V will also run well. Not at such high frame rates but at least 60+ fps (more at lower settings, of course).

      • Thanks for the feedback and I will probably buy the 1660s when I can find one in sale. I also asked the same thing in the under 200$ guide so you can just ignore it :).
        Also would you recommend any particular 1660s or are they all pretty much the same? Don’t really get why they have such difference in prices if they are the same model.

        • Sounds like a great plan, best of luck!

          My personal preference when choosing a card (any GPU) is to go with a larger cooler if it fits and the price difference is minimal. They usually run cool and with less noise (though the 1660S TDP is only 125W, so no cooler will be taxed too hard). All 1660S cards use the manufacturers’ standard coolers, so there should be few surprises.

          And I agree with you in questioning the large price differences. A small premium might be fine in my view if you get better cooling. But just a slight factory overclock, as is often the case, has never been much of a selling point.

  11. Hi Jesper,
    I consider myself to be the typical 60fps 1080p gamer when time allows, so these mid range cards are obviously the sweet spot. I don’t follow hardware or gfx card price movements as I generally just upgrade and forget about it.

    I’m looking to upgrade and only recently became aware that Nvidia is soon to release the RTX 3000 series and AMD are doing something similar with their Big Navi cards. Historically do such releases have any downward pressure on mid range cards like those discussed in the above article, or is it more like a two speed economy with the impact largely resigned to those who want to game at 1440 or 4K?

    tldr; should everyone be holding off from buying a new graphics card right now?

    • Hi Grant,
      That is a very good question. High-end releases typically don’t affect current mid-range card prices by much or at all in the short term. But the RTX 3060 is also likely to arrive soon (sooner than RTX 2060 did by comparison). It could also be aggressively priced if needed to undercut what AMD releases in the same performance bracket (Navi 22).

      In that case, this should definitely put some downward pressure on the current mid-range cards in the relatively near future. But those are many ifs and buts, of course.

    • Grant,

      From, what I have seen, yes, 4k and 1440 it is like a Corvette vs a Ferrari. Both are greater, just that one is greaterer.

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